Sign in / Join

Round Robin Review: Q2 The Return of Quantum and Woody #5

Share:

Every Monday we bring you a quick one paragraph review from each of our writers for this week’s books. Here’s our spoiler free advanced review of Q2: The Return of Quantum and Woody.

Amy’s take

The miniseries that propels Quantum and Woody of the 90s era Valiant Universe into their present day wraps up with this final book. Written and illustrated by the original creators Priest and Bright, and told in their signature non-linear style, this book finalizes the storyline involving the synthetic humans and leaves readers with the possibility of another chapter.

Martin’s take

I definitely enjoyed this issue more than the rest of the crew and I’ll be diving a little deeper in my full review on Wednesday. Priest offers a great resolution to the mystery of the younger Quantum and Woody that has been unraveling throughout the series. Pure 90’s goodness, and a very different take on characters which can often times be slapstick in their current iteration.

Paul’s take

This trip back to the 90s has now come to an end. Everything came together nicely, but nothing wowed me. It was an enjoyable read. I was intrigued by the young Woody and the parallels with the Dark Knight Returns.

Scott’s take

I guess the final issue is a bad place to start reading a mini-series (especially as someone who hasn’t any of Acclaim’s Quantum and Woody)? As such a lot of my observations will probably be nothing new for anyone who has read the previous four issues. For instance, I like how on-the-nose it is that the Woody clone is both in love with Eric, which redefines the Quantum and Woody bromance, and how that clone is also permanently 14 (she even tells the original Woody that, like him, she’ll never grow up). In terms of this issue though, it was peculiar how leisurely-paced it was considering that it’s the final one and that everything needs to be resolved. To Bright and Priest’s credit, they do seemingly manage to tie all of the loose ends up, and they appear to do so in without ever deviating away from their own idiosyncratic style. I do feel that there’s a lot of charm to this issue, even though I don’t always feel privy to some of it being brand-new to the series. Ultimately, I don’t feel entirely comfortable judging this book, but I imagine that fans of Bright and Priest’s Quantum and Woody will really enjoy it.

Originally from ValiantCentral.com

Share: