Sign in / Join

Invisible Republic #1

Share:

by Corinna Bechko, Gabriel Hardman & Jordan Boyd

Invisible Republic takes place in the year 2843 on the moon called Avalon. This takes place after the Malory Regime that was in charge of Avalon had been overthrown. However, with Avalon’s new found freedom leaves the moon vulnerable and abandoned. Those who can, have left the moon and now only the poor are left to deal with a collapsed society. Now an investigative journalist called Croger Babb, is trying to get the story of Avalon after the Malloy Regime fall. However, Babb may have stumbled  into an even bigger story than he was looking for.

Even though Invisible Republic is by definition a sci-fi story, it’s still a very relatable read. Avalon may be a remote moon, but it doesn’t feel distant. For a first issue Bechko and Hardman do an amazing job of setting up the state of Avalon, while still flashing back to before the Malory Regime. Invisible Republic‘s debut never mired in exposition, it’s always just enough to get the reader into the story. Seeing glimpses of both before and after the regime are quite insightful and piques the reader’s curiosity to fill in the huge gap of events in-between.

Another reason Invisible Republic is such a grounded read for a sci-fi story is Gabriel Hardman’s realistic art. Hardman’s rough and detailed style complement the sci-fi angle, but feel realistic. This honest approach makes Invisible Republic feel like such a personal story. Complimented by Jordan Boyd’s muted and neutral colors, Avalon takes on a dirty look with a looming cloud of darkness hovering over Invisible Republic‘s story. This whole issue looked great, flowed flawlessly, and delivered a final page that will bring readers onboard.

This was a wonderful debut for Invisible Republic. Being able to deliver a sci-fi story that doesn’t heavily rely on abstract space concepts is rare these days. Invisible Republic gave readers the one thing they pick up a new series to find: a great story that you can easily be absorbed into. Invisible Republic proved to be a refreshing debut that looks to only get more interesting from here.

InvisibleRepublic-01-de49b

Share: